WWW Wednesday 4th October 2022 | #WWWWednesday #booktwitter #amreading

And yet this same Sancho will go on to tread the boards of London’s theatres, become a highly acclaimed musician and composer, lead the fight to end slavery, meet the King and become the very first Black person to vote in Britain . . .
MEET CHARLES IGNATIUS SANCHO: HIS EXTRAORDINARY STORY, HIDDEN FOR THREE HUNDRED YEARS, IS ABOUT TO BE TOLD. DISCOVER GEORGIAN LONDON AS YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE.
I’ve recently finished The Edinburgh Skating Club by Michelle Sloan and I loved this dual time line story set in present day and 18th century Edinburgh. I reviewed the book yesterday and you can read my review here.

Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. So, let’s get to it!

The three Ws are:
What are you currently reading?
What have you finished reading?
What will you read next?

If you look behind her, you’ll see me.When you look at a painting, what do you really see?Next on my reading list is the memoir Women Like Us by Amanda Prowse. I’ve read loads of Amanda’s novels and she’s such a brilliant storyteller. I’ve also enjoyed her weekly piece called Tangerine where she talks about her everyday life. I find that really relatable and often very funny so I’m looking forward to this glimpse into her life.I had little right to live, born on a slave ship where my parents both died. But I survived, and indeed, you might say I did more…Sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always entirely relatable, Prowse details her early struggles with self-esteem and how she coped with the frustrating expectations others had of how she should live. Most poignantly, she delves into her toxic relationship with food, the hardest addiction she has ever known, and how she journeyed out the other side.

It’s 1746 and Georgian London is not a safe place for a young Black man, especially one who has escaped slavery. After the twinkling lights in the Fleet Street coffee shops are blown out and the great houses have closed their doors for the night, Sancho is utterly alone. The man he hoped would help is dying. Sancho is desperate.

It’s time for this week’s WWW Wednesday. This is a weekly feature
hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words.

When eighteenth-century poet Alison Cockburn accepts a light-hearted challenge from her friend Katherine Hume to live as a man, in order to infiltrate Edinburgh’s all-male skating club, little do they both realise how her new identity will shape their future.
I’ve just started reading The Secret Diaries of Charles Ignatius Sancho by Paterson Joseph. It sounds fascinating as it’s based on the true story of an incredible sounding man. Charles was born on a slave ship, escaped slavery, became a musician and was the first black person to vote in Britain. I can’t wait to find out more about him. The book will be published tomorrow by Dialogue Books.
What have you finished reading?
Amanda Prowse has built a bestselling career on the lives of fictional women. Now she turns the pen on her own life.

The Edinburgh Skating Club is the tale of one woman’s mission to infiltrate a male-dominated society. Imaginative, romantic and ultimately moving, this time-shift adventure celebrates the women overlooked by history – and, above all, love, in all its unexpected forms.

So that’s WWW Wednesday complete. Have you read any of these books? Do any catch your fancy? Let me know in the comments and if you take part yourself, pop a link to your post in the comments too. I do like to see what everyone is reading!

What will you read next?
It’s time for him to tell his story, one that begins on a tempestuous Atlantic Ocean, and ends at the very centre of London life. And through it all, he must ask: born amongst death, how much can you achieve in one short life?
From her childhood, where there was no blueprint for success, to building a career as a bestselling novelist against all odds, Amanda Prowse explores what it means to be a woman in a world where popularity, slimness, beauty and youth are currency—and how she overcame all of that to forge her own path to happiness.
And in the present, art historian Claire Sharp receives a mysterious request: to settle once and for all the true provenance of the iconic painting The Skating Minister.
I guess the first question to ask is, what kind of woman am I? Well, you know those women who saunter into a room, immaculately coiffed and primped from head to toe?
What are you currently reading?

One of the most candid memoirs you’re ever likely to read, Women Like Us provides welcome insight into how it is possible—against the odds—to overcome insecurity, body consciousness and the ubiquitous imposter syndrome to find happiness and success, from a woman who’s done it all, and then some.

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