Under the Reader’s Radar – celebrating the quiet novel

So in each post I’ll aim to highlight a couple of titles that may have been missed from your reading awareness. Hopefully you’ll discover a treat or two. And please do let me know if you have any books you’d like to suggest.
Here’s what she had to say:
“This is a skillfully written gritty noir book with well-developed characters and a gripping story line not for the faint hearted. It focuses on choices and consequences and left my head spinning.
The main theme of They Were Sisters (1943) is that three sisters’ choice of husband dictates whether they have homes, and whether, in their homes, they will be allowed to flourish, be tamed or repressed. We see three different choices and three different husbands: the best-friend, soul-mate husband of the one sister, who brings her great joy; the would-be companionable husband of another, who over-indulges and finally bores her; and the bullying husband who turns a high-spirited, naive young girl into a deeply unhappy woman. It is the last husband, Geoffrey, who is the most horrifying character in The Were Sisters.


Here’s what she had to say:
1949: Rudy, A Jewish New Yorker snatches a briefcase of cash from a dead man in Los Angeles and runs away from his old life, into the arms of the Boston mob.
The second title was picked by SE Moorhead. Her novel, Witness X was published by Trapeze on  6 February 2020. She chose Say Goodbye When I’m Gone by Stephen J Golds, published by Red Dog Press.
The second title was picked by SE Moorhead. Her novel, Witness X was published by Trapeze on  6 February 2020. She chose Say Goodbye When I’m Gone by Stephen J Golds, published by Red Dog Press.
Man’s cruelty to woman is a frequent theme in Dorothy Whipple’s novels, but nowhere was there more scope for man to be cruel to his wife than in Britain before the reform of the divorce laws.

Avery North has been contentedly married to Ellen for 20 years, they have two children and live in the rural commuter belt outside London. Then his mother advertises for a companion, and the French girl who arrives sets her sights on Avery, callously threatening the happy marriage.

Posted by Contributor